James Eagan Holmes
“I’m not sure if i am waiting for the next chapter to begin or just waiting for my story to finally come to an end but there is no happy ending for me just a long thread of beautiful tragedy…”
"MR. HOLMES SUFFERS FROM A SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS AND WAS IN THE THROES OF A PSYCHOTIC EPISODE WHEN HE COMMITTED THE ACTS THAT RESULTED IN THE TRAGIC LOSS OF LIFE AND INJURIES" via James Holmes’ defense team.
                                       WHAT IS PSYCHOSIS?
Psychosis is a serious mental disorder characterized by thinking and emotions that are so impaired, that they indicate that the person experiencing them has lost contact with reality.
People who are psychotic have false thoughts (delusions) and/or see or hear things that are not there (hallucinations). 
These experiences can be frightening and may cause people who are suffering from psychosis to hurt themselves or others.
Psychosis affects three out of every 100 people. It is most likely to be diagnosed in young adults, but psychosis can happen to anyone.
Recognizing the Signs of Psychosis

Early stage psychosis:
difficulty concentrating
depressed mood
sleep changes—sleeping too much or not enough
anxiety
suspiciousness
withdrawal from family and friends
ongoing unusual thoughts and beliefs
Later stage psychosis
delusions
hallucinations
disorganized speech—switching topics erratically
depression
anxiety
suicidal thoughts or actions
difficulty functioning
What Are Delusions and Hallucinations?

Delusions
A delusion is a false belief or impression that is firmly held even though it is contradicted by reality and what is commonly held as true. There are delusions of paranoia, grandiose delusions, and somatic delusions.
Hallucinations
A hallucination is a sensory perception in the absence of outside stimulus. That means seeing, hearing, feeling, or smelling something that isn’t present. A person who is hallucinating might see things that don’t exist or hear people talking when he or she is alone.
Delusions and hallucinations seem real to the person who is experiencing them.
Psychotic Disorders

The following types of psychoses are called psychotic disorders. They can be triggered by stress, injury or illness, or they can appear on their own.
Bipolar Disorder
When someone has bipolar disorder, his or her moods swing from very high to very low. When his or her mood is high and positive, he or she may have symptoms of psychosis. The individual may feel extremely good and believe he or she has special powers (not related but thinking about James’ science camp video where he says that people "may believe they have special powers."). When his or her mood is depressed, the individual may have psychotic symptoms that make him or her feel angry, sad, or frightened. These symptoms include thinking someone is trying to harm him or her.
Delusional Disorder
A person suffering from delusional disorder strongly believes in things that are not real.
Psychotic Depression
This is major depression with psychotic symptoms.
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is psychosis that lasts longer than six months. Schizophrenia is a lifelong disease.
Treatment of Psychosis

Treating psychosis may involve a combination of medications and therapy. Most people recover from psychosis with treatment.
Rapid Tranquilization
Sometimes people suffering from psychosis can become agitated and be at risk of hurting themselves or others. In those cases, it may be necessary to calm them down quickly. This method is called rapid tranquilization. A doctor or emergency response personnel will administer a fast-acting shot or liquid medicine to relax the patient right away. (I’m guessing James’ stay in the psychiatric ward in Novemeber, 2012.)
Drugs and medication
Symptoms of psychosis can be controlled with medications called antipsychotics. These medicines reduce hallucinations and delusions and help people think more clearly. The type of medicine you are prescribed will depend on which symptoms you are experiencing. In many cases, people only need to take antipsychotics for a short time to get their symptoms under control. People with schizophrenia may have to stay on medications for life. (It’s my guess that James is on antipsychotics now. He may also still be being sedated.)
http://www.healthline.com/health/psychosis#Recovery2
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/10/james-holmes-lawyers_n_3577081.html
http://www.sodahead.com/living/poem—-beautiful-tragedy/question-1803679/

I’m not sure if i am waiting for the next chapter to begin or just waiting for my story to finally come to an end but there is no happy ending for me just a long thread of beautiful tragedy…”

"MR. HOLMES SUFFERS FROM A SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS AND WAS IN THE THROES OF A PSYCHOTIC EPISODE WHEN HE COMMITTED THE ACTS THAT RESULTED IN THE TRAGIC LOSS OF LIFE AND INJURIES" via James Holmes’ defense team.

                                       WHAT IS PSYCHOSIS?

Psychosis is a serious mental disorder characterized by thinking and emotions that are so impaired, that they indicate that the person experiencing them has lost contact with reality.

People who are psychotic have false thoughts (delusions) and/or see or hear things that are not there (hallucinations). 

These experiences can be frightening and may cause people who are suffering from psychosis to hurt themselves or others.

Psychosis affects three out of every 100 people. It is most likely to be diagnosed in young adults, but psychosis can happen to anyone.

Recognizing the Signs of Psychosis

Early stage psychosis:

  • difficulty concentrating
  • depressed mood
  • sleep changes—sleeping too much or not enough
  • anxiety
  • suspiciousness
  • withdrawal from family and friends
  • ongoing unusual thoughts and beliefs

Later stage psychosis

  • delusions
  • hallucinations
  • disorganized speech—switching topics erratically
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • suicidal thoughts or actions
  • difficulty functioning

What Are Delusions and Hallucinations?

Delusions

delusion is a false belief or impression that is firmly held even though it is contradicted by reality and what is commonly held as true. There are delusions of paranoia, grandiose delusions, and somatic delusions.

Hallucinations

A hallucination is a sensory perception in the absence of outside stimulus. That means seeing, hearing, feeling, or smelling something that isn’t present. A person who is hallucinating might see things that don’t exist or hear people talking when he or she is alone.

Delusions and hallucinations seem real to the person who is experiencing them.

Psychotic Disorders

The following types of psychoses are called psychotic disorders. They can be triggered by stress, injury or illness, or they can appear on their own.

Bipolar Disorder

When someone has bipolar disorder, his or her moods swing from very high to very low. When his or her mood is high and positive, he or she may have symptoms of psychosis. The individual may feel extremely good and believe he or she has special powers (not related but thinking about James’ science camp video where he says that people "may believe they have special powers."). When his or her mood is depressed, the individual may have psychotic symptoms that make him or her feel angry, sad, or frightened. These symptoms include thinking someone is trying to harm him or her.

Delusional Disorder

A person suffering from delusional disorder strongly believes in things that are not real.

Psychotic Depression

This is major depression with psychotic symptoms.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is psychosis that lasts longer than six months. Schizophrenia is a lifelong disease.

Treatment of Psychosis

Treating psychosis may involve a combination of medications and therapy. Most people recover from psychosis with treatment.

Rapid Tranquilization

Sometimes people suffering from psychosis can become agitated and be at risk of hurting themselves or others. In those cases, it may be necessary to calm them down quickly. This method is called rapid tranquilization. A doctor or emergency response personnel will administer a fast-acting shot or liquid medicine to relax the patient right away. (I’m guessing James’ stay in the psychiatric ward in Novemeber, 2012.)

Drugs and medication

Symptoms of psychosis can be controlled with medications called antipsychotics. These medicines reduce hallucinations and delusions and help people think more clearly. The type of medicine you are prescribed will depend on which symptoms you are experiencing. In many cases, people only need to take antipsychotics for a short time to get their symptoms under control. People with schizophrenia may have to stay on medications for life. (It’s my guess that James is on antipsychotics now. He may also still be being sedated.)

http://www.healthline.com/health/psychosis#Recovery2

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/10/james-holmes-lawyers_n_3577081.html

http://www.sodahead.com/living/poem—-beautiful-tragedy/question-1803679/

agoraphobichousewife:

 ”The package was intercepted by police and contained a brown spiral notebook with the name “James Holmes” written on it. In a space reserved for the course name, someone wrote “Of Life,” investigators wrote.”
James Holmes course of life.

agoraphobichousewife:

 ”The package was intercepted by police and contained a brown spiral notebook with the name “James Holmes” written on it. In a space reserved for the course name, someone wrote “Of Life,” investigators wrote.”


James Holmes course of life.

These fascinations likely stemmed from my interest in puzzles and paradoxes as an adolescent and continued through my curiosity in academic research

JAMES HOLMES

Continuity, consistency; alas, a sad end for such a promising future, Jimmy….

Detective Thomas Wilson said a page from a spiral notebook found in a backpack in Holmes’ apartment contained a drawing that depicted “a maze game … a serial killer and a downtown Denver address called LoDo’s”

The notebook was found in a backpack on the floor of the living room, and the backpack also held a withdrawal form from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Wilson said. The form had not been signed by Holmes.

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_24370980/bomb-tech-devices-james-holmes-apartment-would-have

How can I write to Jamie??
Anonymous

James is being video recorded 24/7 (the prosecution requested access to the recordings). That, coupled with James’ mental illness and his pending trial, I can almost guarantee you James will not read or answer anyone’s letters right now. Here’s his addy in case you would like to try:

JAMES EAGAN HOLMES 
#201200009751 
P.O. Box 4918 
Centennial, CO 80155-4918

Judge denies request for special prosecutor to probe leak to Fox News reporter jana winter in theater shooting. http://t.co/k8UJ8PboLm/s/8dti
NEW: Hearing set for Sept 22 to decide if cameras will be allowed during James Holmes’ trial.
via 7 Marshall
James Holmes’ Second Psychiatric Evaluation

I had a brief hit from the PD’s office. They were looking at an older post about forensic evaluations. I don’t know whether this confirms that James Holmes is presently in the process of his second psychiatric evaluation, but here’s some more general information about what goes on in an exam. The rest of it is kind of a review as to what qualifies as insanity at the time of said offense.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CLINICAL AND FORENSIC INTERVIEWS

Goal: to obtain information as reliable and
accurate as possible vs.Goal: to assess and provide treatment of
symptoms

Fact-finding focus – accurate recollection of events important vs.Therapeutic focus – Attributions and perceptions of events important

Objectivity, neutrality, avoidance of biases vs. Empathy, therapeutic alliance, support of Client  

Court is the client  vs. Person is the client 

Consent to obtain outside information and disclose information is obtained and understood prior to proceeding with the interview vs. Client’s consent required to seek external verification of information and to provide information to outside sources

Interviews are formal and restrictive Interviewing strategies are variable vs.Confidentiality restricted Traditional confidentiality

Competency of client questioned vs. Competency of Client not the primary concern

Recorded vs. Private

DOS AND DON’TS OF THE INTERVIEW

Dos:

(1) Consult counsel once allegations are made.
(2) Prepare and discuss an interview plan or theme.
(3) Conduct one interview at a time, unless the situation
dictates otherwise.
(4) Arrange a safe and private interview location.

(5) Gather and organize pertinent documents before
the interview.
(6) Obtain information concerning the person being
interviewed before the interview.
(7) Exhibit courteous and professional appearance and
behavior at all times.
(8) Be punctual.
(9) Conduct the interview with more than one person.
(10) Establish rapport during initial contact.
(11) Maintain control in the interview.
(12) Close on a positive note for future contacts.
(13) Prepare reports as close as possible to interview.
(14) Listen to your instincts.

Don’ts:

(1) Conduct interview without a plan of action.
(2) Fail to discuss the interview with partner.
(3) Argue with interviewee.
(4) Lose objectivity during the interview.
(5) Become judgmental during a confession.
(6) Include personal opinions in notes or written
reports.
(7) Provide promises or assurances.
(8) Threaten interviewee with disclosure of interview
results, discipline, or job security.
(9) Discuss interviews with anyone outside of the
investigation.

http://www.aicpa.org/InterestAreas/ForensicAndValuation/Resources/PractAidsGuidance/DownloadableDocuments/10834-378_interview%20whiite%20paper-FINAL-v1.pdf

PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

http://www.psychpage.com/learning/library/assess/assess.html

TESTS FOR INSANITY

M’Naghten Rule

The M’Naghten rule or standard provides that for an individual to be found Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity (NGRI), he or she must be “laboring under such a defect of reason, from disease of the mind, as not to know the nature and quality of the act he was doing; or if he knew it, that he did not know he was doing what was wrong.” The concept of disease of the mind excludes voluntary intoxication either by alcohol or drugs and strong emotional states.

Irresistible Impulse Test

The Irresistible Impulse Test was first adopted by the Alabama Supreme Court in the 1887 case of Parsons v. State.  The Alabama court stated that even though the defendant could tell right from wrong, he was subject tothe duress of such mental disease [that] he had … lost the power to choose between right and wrong” and that “his free agency was at the time destroyed,” and thus, the alleged crime was so connected with such mental disease, in the relation of cause and effect, as to have been the product of it solely.”  In their finding, the court assigned responsibility for the crime to the mental illness despite the defendant’s ability to distinguish right from wrong.  The Irresistible Impulse Test gained acceptance in various states as an addition to the M’Naghten Rule, under which right versus wrong was still considered a critical part of any definition of insanity.  In some cases, the Irresistible Impulse Test was considered to be a variation on M’Naghten; in others, it was considered to be a separate test.  Although the Irresistible Impulse Test was considered to be an important correction on the M’Naghten’s cognitive bias, it still came under criticism of its own.  For example, it was criticized for making the definition of insanity too broad, failing to take into account the impossibility of determining which acts were uncontrollable rather than merely uncontrolled, and also making it easier to malinger or fake insanity.  The Irresistible Impulse Test was also criticized for being too narrow; like M’Naghten, the test seemed to exclude all but those totally unable to control their actions.  Nevertheless, several states currently use this test along with the M’Naghten Rule to determine insanity, and the American Law Institute in its Model Penal Code definition of insanity adopted a modified version of it.

ALI Model Penal Code

The American Law Institute (ALI) designed a new test for its Model Penal Code in 1962, in response to criticisms of the various tests for the insanity defense (including the Irresistible Impulse Test).  Under the ALI Model Penal Code test (ALI Test), “a person is not responsible for criminal conduct if at the time of such conduct as a result of mental disease or defect he lacks substantial capacity either to appreciate the criminality of his conduct or to conform his conduct to the requirements of the law.”

The ALI Model Penal Code test is much broader than the M’Naghten Rule and the Irresistible Impulse Test. It asks whether defendants have a substantial incapacity to appreciate the criminality of their conduct or to conform their conduct to the law rather than the absolute knowledge required by M’Naghten and the absolute inability to control conduct required by the Irresistible Impulse Test.

The ALI Model Penal Code test also requires that the mental disease or defect be a mental diagnosis.  In this way, it manages to incorporate elements of all three of its predecessors:  the knowledge of right and wrong required by M’Naghten; the prerequisite of lack of control in the Irresistible Impulse Test; and the diagnosis of mental disease and defect required by Durham.

Such a broad based rule received wide acceptance, and by 1982 all federal courts and a majority of state courts had adopted the ALI test.  While some states have since dropped the ALI test, and it no longer applies at the federal level, 18 states still use the ALI test in their definitions of insanity.

Durham Standard

In Durham v. United States, the court ruled that a defendant is entitled to acquittal if the crime was the product of his mental illness (i.e., crime would not have been committed but for the disease).  The Durham test, also called the Product Test, is broader than either the M’Naghten test or the Irresistible Impulse test. The Durham test has much more lenient guideline for the insanity defense, but it addressed the issue of convicting mentally ill defendants, which was allowed under the M’Naghten Rule.  However, the Durham standard drew much criticism because of its expansive definition of legal insanity.

STATE STANDARDS REGARDING THE INSANITY DEFENSE

Colorado SECTION 2.  Article 8 of title 16, Colorado Revised Statutes, 1986

16-8-101.5.  Insanity defined – offenses committed on and after July 1, 1995. (1)  The applicable test of insanity shall be:

(a)  A person who is so diseased or defective in mind at the time of the commission of the act as to be incapable of distinguishing right from wrong with respect to that act is not accountable; except that care should be taken not to confuse such mental disease or defect with moral obliquity, mental depravity, or passion growing out of anger, revenge, hatred, or other motives and kindred evil conditions, for, when the act is induced by any of these causes, the person is accountable to the law; or

(b)  A person who suffered from a condition of mind caused by mental disease or defect that prevented the person from forming a culpable mental state that is an essential element of a crime charged, but care should be taken not to confuse such mental disease or defect with moral obliquity, mental depravity, or passion growing out of anger, revenge, hatred, or other motives and kindred evil conditions because, when the act is induced by any of these causes, the person is accountable to the law.

(2)  As used in subsection (1) of this section:

(a)  ”Diseased or defective in mind” does not refer to an abnormality manifested only by repeated criminal or otherwise antisocial conduct.

(b)  ”Mental disease or defect” includes only those severely abnormal mental conditions that grossly and demonstrably impair a person’s perception or understanding of reality and that are not attributable to the voluntary ingestion of alcohol or any other psychoactive substance but does not include an abnormality manifested only by repeated criminal or otherwise antisocial conduct.

(3)  This section shall apply to offenses committed on or after July 1, 1995.

 http://psycholegalassessments.com/areas-of-expertise/criminal-responsibility-or-sanity-at-the-time-of-the-offense/